Your Time Could Be Short

Republicans welcomed the new director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Richard Cordray to his first Senate hearing Tuesday, but not without a simple warning: Your time on the job could be short.

The Committee’s senior Republican Richard Shelby commented, “I suspect that the Supreme Court will ultimately decide the constitutionality of the president’s action,” referring to the controversial appointment of Cordray to the post by President Obama.

Here are some of the shots from the hearing, which I had hoped would have some more highlighted back and forth between Republicans and Cordray – but to my dismay, everyone stayed pretty civil.

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director RICHARD CORDRAY testifies before the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee Hearing on "Holding the CPFB Accountable". (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)
Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director RICHARD CORDRAY testifies before the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee Hearing on “Holding the CPFB Accountable”. (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

 

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director RICHARD CORDRAY testifies before the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee Hearing on "Holding the CPFB Accountable". (James Berglie/ZUMA Press) 

Senator RICHARDY SHELBY questions Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Richard Cordray at the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee Hearing on "Holding the CPFB Accountable". (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

Jobs Jobs Jobs…

The back and forth between republicans and democrats on the best way to face our “jobs crisis” is quite entertaining — and was the subject of my coverage on the hill Tuesday.

 

House Speaker JOHN BOEHNER (R-Ohio) holds a media availability immediately after the Republican Conference meeting. (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

House Speaker JOHN BOEHNER (R-Ohio) holds a media availability immediately after the Republican Conference meeting. (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

 

Congressman KEITH ELLISON speaks to the media.  The Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC) held a news conference to unveil the "Restore the American Dream for the 99% Act," which seeks to create more than 4 million jobs, save more than $2 trillion, and eliminate new spending gaps triggered by the lack of consensus of the "Super Committee." (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

Congressman KEITH ELLISON speaks to the media. The Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC) held a news conference to unveil the "Restore the American Dream for the 99% Act," which seeks to create more than 4 million jobs, save more than $2 trillion, and eliminate new spending gaps triggered by the lack of consensus of the "Super Committee." (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

 

House Majority Leader ERIC CANTOR (R-Va.) speaks at a media availability immediately after the Republican Conference meeting. (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

House Majority Leader ERIC CANTOR (R-Va.) speaks at a media availability immediately after the Republican Conference meeting. (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

 

Representative ROSA DeLAURO speaks to the media.  The Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC) held a news conference to unveil the "Restore the American Dream for the 99% Act," which seeks to create more than 4 million jobs, save more than $2 trillion, and eliminate new spending gaps triggered by the lack of consensus of the "Super Committee." (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

Representative ROSA DeLAURO speaks to the media. The Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC) held a news conference to unveil the "Restore the American Dream for the 99% Act," which seeks to create more than 4 million jobs, save more than $2 trillion, and eliminate new spending gaps triggered by the lack of consensus of the "Super Committee." (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

Holder Grilled on “Fast and Furious”

I figured it would be an interesting hearing today, when Congressman Darrell Issa walked past me and a few other photographers, and pointing to the barrage of police commissioners positioned behind Attorney General Eric Holder’s seat, said “You know you’re in deep s**t if you’ve got that as your backdrop.”

To my surprise, the Attorney General seemed to be in a good mood this morning even though he was expecting an onslaught of tough questions from committee members.  Holder even joked with us photographers, giving us a hard time for taking some photos that might expose his bald spot to the world.

 

 

 

Attorney General ERIC HOLDER testifies before the House Judiciary Committee on Justice Department oversight.  Holder was specifically asked questions on the botched Justice Department operation code named "Fast and Furious". (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

Attorney General ERIC HOLDER testifies before the House Judiciary Committee on Justice Department oversight. Holder was specifically asked questions on the botched Justice Department operation code named "Fast and Furious". (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

 

Attorney General ERIC HOLDER testifies before the House Judiciary Committee on Justice Department oversight.  Holder was specifically asked questions on the botched Justice Department operation code named "Fast and Furious". (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

Attorney General ERIC HOLDER testifies before the House Judiciary Committee on Justice Department oversight. Holder was specifically asked questions on the botched Justice Department operation code named "Fast and Furious". (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

 

Attorney General ERIC HOLDER speaks with Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Legislative Affairs at the Department of Justice RONALD WEICH prior to testifying before the House Judiciary Committee on Justice Department oversight.  Holder was specifically asked questions on the botched Justice Department operation code named "Fast and Furious". (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

Attorney General ERIC HOLDER speaks with Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Legislative Affairs at the Department of Justice RONALD WEICH prior to testifying before the House Judiciary Committee on Justice Department oversight. Holder was specifically asked questions on the botched Justice Department operation code named "Fast and Furious". (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

 

 

Frank Defends His Decision

Congressman Barney Frank announced Monday that he would not be seeking re-election, and on Tuesday he faced the media at the Capitol to defend his record, and his decision to step down from reporters who were quick to speculate about his reasons for leaving.

Congressman Frank has lead the way with legislation to make online gambling legal –  that of which I have a very strong personal interest in —  so I’m a little nervous now who will carry the torch in efforts to make online poker legal now!! 🙁

 

Congressman BARNEY FRANK speaks to the media in Washington just one day after announcing that he will not run for reelection. (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

Congressman BARNEY FRANK speaks to the media in Washington just one day after announcing that he will not run for reelection. (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

 

Congressman BARNEY FRANK prepares to speak to the media in Washington just one day after announcing that he will not run for reelection. (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

Congressman BARNEY FRANK prepares to speak to the media in Washington just one day after announcing that he will not run for reelection. (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

 

Congressman BARNEY FRANK speaks to the media in Washington just one day after announcing that he will not run for reelection. (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

Congressman BARNEY FRANK speaks to the media in Washington just one day after announcing that he will not run for reelection. (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

And you think your Christmas Tree is a pain…

118 years old, and 63 foot tall – this Sierra White Fir from California will serve as the official Capitol Christmas Tree this year.  It is quite an ordeal to get this monster into place!

 

Workers help unload the official Christmas Tree at the US Capitol as it arrives from California.  This year's Capitol Christmas tree is 118 years old, 63 feet tall and weighs 8300 pounds. (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

Workers help unload the official Christmas Tree at the US Capitol as it arrives from California. This year's Capitol Christmas tree is 118 years old, 63 feet tall and weighs 8300 pounds. (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

 

Workers help unload the official Christmas Tree at the US Capitol as it arrives from California.  This year's Capitol Christmas tree is 118 years old, 63 feet tall and weighs 8300 pounds. (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

Workers help unload the official Christmas Tree at the US Capitol as it arrives from California. This year's Capitol Christmas tree is 118 years old, 63 feet tall and weighs 8300 pounds. (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

The official Christmas Tree at the US Capitol is hoisted into place at after a long journey by truck from California.  This year's Capitol Christmas tree is 118 years old, 63 feet tall and weighs 8300 pounds. (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

The official Christmas Tree at the US Capitol is hoisted into place at after a long journey by truck from California. This year's Capitol Christmas tree is 118 years old, 63 feet tall and weighs 8300 pounds. (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

 

Workers help place the official Christmas Tree at the US Capitol as it arrives from California.  This year's Capitol Christmas tree is 118 years old, 63 feet tall and weighs 8300 pounds. (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)

Workers help place the official Christmas Tree at the US Capitol as it arrives from California. This year's Capitol Christmas tree is 118 years old, 63 feet tall and weighs 8300 pounds. (James Berglie/ZUMA Press)